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Karl Tersztyánszky
von Nádás
FML Karl Tersztyánszky von Nadas was appointed to command the IV. Corps in September 1912, replacing FZM Viktor Schreiber.  This command he held until April 1915, when he was succeeded by FML Albert Schmidt von Georgenegg.  GdK Karl Tersztyánszky was an active commander from the outset of the war, and led a variety of different forces during his four years in battle.  He commanded the IV. Corps in the II. Army of General Böhm-Ermolli until late May 1915.  Then, Army Group Tersztyánszky was created on 27 May 1915, and essentially guarded the Vojvodina and Bosnian frontiers from Serb incursions; it was disbanded on September 7, 1915.  Tersztyánszky was immediately appointed to organise the new III. Army on 8 September 1915, thus replacing General Puhallo, (who held this responsibility for an interim period before ascending to command the I. Army).  Tersztyánszky himself remained in this command only until 27 September 1915, after the III. Army had successfully assembled in the Vojvodina to take part in the invasion of Serbia. 

In spite of his Magyar origins, Tersztyánszky found himself on the wrong end of Hungarian Premier
István Tisza's temper by engaging in a severe dispute with the Premier's friend, Baron Bela Tallián.  Tisza considered Tersztyánszky part-and-parcel of the Army High Command, and therefore should not be allowed to overrule a Hungarian governmental authority.  Tisza therefore insisted on his removal from command of the IV. Army.  Thus, the Premier's clout in military affairs was amply illustrated.

General von Cramon states "Toward the end of September [1915] the Imperial Austrian Army, composed of Austrian and German troops, stood to the northwest and north of Belgrade, the German XI. Army in the region of Versetsch.  Tersztyanszky had originally been chosen as the  commander of the Austrians.  Shortly, however, before the operations began he had a quarrel in his headquarters with one of the officials of Tisza and this assumed such proportions that the all-powerful Hungarian President of the Ministry brought the question before the Emperor, Franz Josef.  The latter, as could not otherwise be expected, in view of the powerful position occupied by tisza, dropped the General.  In Teschen, at least among the younger men, the departure of Tersztyanszky was not particularly regretted.  Instead of him, General von
Kövess now had the honour of winning Belgrade."

Tersztyánszky was removed from his position to placate the Premier, but the Army High Command at Teschen was not to be ordered around by an upstart civil governor.  After a period of nine months, Tersztyánszky was appointed to  reorganise the severely mauled IV. Army in late June 1916, replacing the
Archduke Josef Ferdinand at the insistance of the Germans.  He had been promoted to Generaloberst in May, before this.  

Tersztyánszky was reappointed to command the III. Army, which he was supposed to lead against Serbia two years earlier on 5 March 1917; meanwhile, command of the IV. Army was given to General
Karl von Kirchbach. During the Russian summer offensive in 1917, Tersztyánszky's sector was struck heavily by the Russians and he subsequently forfeited command to General Kritek in July 1917.

GWS, 10/01
Orders of Battle:  Vojvodina Front, August 1914
Assembling forces prior to their transfer to Galicia in the middle of the month
II. Armee, Gen. d. Kav. Eduard von Böhm-Ermolli
     IV. Korps, Gen. d. Kav. Tersztyánszky von Nádás
          XXXI. inf. div., Feldmlt.
Erzherzog Josef
          XXXII. inf. div., Feldmlt.
Fail-Greißler
Orders of Battle:  Volhynian Front, September 1914
Sent to aid General Kövess' XII. Army Corps defending Eastern Galicia

Army Group Kövess; II. Armee, Gen. von Böhm-Ermolli
     IV. Korps, Gen. d. Kav. Tersztyánszky von Nádás
          XXXI. inf. div., Feldmlt.
Erzherzog Josef
          XXXII. inf. div., Feldmlt.
Fail-Greißler
Orders of Battle:  Christmas Day 1914
Immediately preceding the Battles for the Carpathians

Army Group Woyrsch, Gen. Remus von Woyrsch
II. Army, GdI
Eduard von Böhm-Ermolli
     IV. Corps, GdK Tersztyánszky
       31. inf. div., FML von Lütgendorf
       35. Deutsch Cav. Div., Gen. von Schmettau

As of Christmas Day, Tersztyánszky had his HQ situated southwest of Lodz in Russian Poland, at the village of Stara, 1 km east of the river Pilica.  His sector was almost 20 km long, running north to south, and was bound by Gallwitz Corps on his left and GdK Hermann Kövess’ XII. Corps on his right.  On Christmas Day, there was some heavy action in the southern part of the sector, as the Russian Grendiers division in the 4. Army attempted to break west toward Stara.  Kövess threw the 16. Inf. Div. of FML Schariczer into the fray, and the fighting was reportedly horrendous amidst the frozen marshes of a muddy creek called the Carna, which formed  Schmettau’s main defense line some 10 km east of the Pilica.  A few days after the battle of Tomaszów, fought further north, the entire 2. Army was transferred to the Carpathians. [rev. 5/04]
Orders of Battle:  Galician Front, January 1915
Immediately preceding the Battles for the Carpathians

Army Group Woyrsch
II. Armee, Gen. d. Kav.
von Böhm-Ermolli
     IV. Korps, Gen. d. Kav. Tersztyánszky von Nádás
          XXXI. inf. div., Feldmlt. von Lütgendof
          XXXII. inf. div., Feldmlt.
Goiginger
Orders of Battle:  Eastern Front, May 1915
Immediately preceding the Dunajec offensive
II. Armee, Gen. d. Kav. Eduard von Böhm-Ermolli
   IV. Korps, Gen. d. Kav. v. Tersztyánszky
   Chief of Staff, Obstlt. Frh. v. Salis-Samaden
       13. Schützen div.,   Feldmlt. Edl. v. Kreysa
                  25. Schützen brig.,  Oberst Richter
                  26. Schützen brig.,  Genmj. Riml
                  13. field art. brig.,   Genmj. Tunk
       32. inf. div., Genmj. Ritt. v. Willerding
              63. inf. brig., Genmj. Edl. v. Obauer
              64. inf. brig., Genmj. Grallert
              32. field art. brig., Genmj. Kreycy
       31. inf. div., Feldmlt. Frh. v. Lütgendorf
              61. IBrig. Genmj. v. Felix
              31. field art. brig., Oberst Schirza
       43. Schützen div.,   Feldmlt. Schmidt v. Georgenegg
                  59. inf. brig., Genmj. Kroupa
                  86. Schützen brig.,  Oberst Ritt. v. Zygadlowicz
                  54. inf. brig., Oberst v. Watterich
                  43. field art. brig., Oberst Michalek

Orders of Battle:  Balkan Front, late May 1915
Made independent of II. Army on 27 May 1915
Army Group Tersztyánszky, Gen. d. Kav. v. Tersztyánszky
    Chief of Staff, Oberst Adalbert v. Dani
       59. inf. div., Feldmlt.
Lukas Snjaric
                       9. mtn. brig., Genmj. Edl. v. Hrozny
                       18. mtn. brig., Genmj. Skvor
       61. inf. div., Feldmlt. Winkler
                        10.mtn. brig., Genmj. v. Droffa
                        16. Honved mtn. brig., Genmj. Breit
       Rayon Banat: Feldmlt. Hess
                      Pancsova, Oberst Szabo
                      Homokos, Genmj. Mrazek
                      Ungarisch Weißkirchen, Obstlt. Sagai
                      Berszazka, Oberst Minnach
                      Orsova, Oberst Franzl
       Rayon Syrmia, Feldmlt.
Adalbert v. Tamasy
                       Grk, Oberst Hodula
                       Mitrovica, Oberst v. Ybl
                       Nikinci, Oberst Guha
                       Asanja, Feldmlt. v. Jozsa
                        Surcin, Genmj. Füllöpp
Tersztyánszky as General der Kavallerie
Orders of Battle:  Galician Front, July 1916
Immediately following the Brussilov Offensive
Linsingen Army Group
IV. Armee,
Generaloberst Tersztyánszky von Nádás
          X. kav. div., Genmj. von Bauer
     Szurmay Korps, Genmj.
von Szurmay
          LXX. Honved inf. div., Genmj.
Goldbach
          XI. inf. div., Genmj. von Bauer
     X. Korps, Gen. d. Inf. von Csanady
          XIII. Schützen div., Genmj. Kalser von Maasfeld
          II. inf. div., Genmj. von Jemrich
          XXXVII. Honved inf. div., Genmj. Haber
     Deutsch X. Korps, Genlt. von Lüttwitz
          XIX. inf. div., Genlt. von Schmettau
          XX. inf. div., Genlt. ?
          XXIX. K.u.K. inf. div., Feldmlt. Schön
     Bernhardi Group, Gen. d. Kav.
von Bernhardi
          German comb. inf. div., Genmj. Rusche
          XI. Bay. inf. div., Genlt.
von Kneußl
     II. K.u.K. Korps, Feldmlt.
Kaiser
          XLI. Honved inf. div., Genmj.
Schamschula
          IV. inf. div., Genmj. Pfeffer
     Fath Korps, Gen. d. Inf. Fath
          XXVI. Schützen div., Feldmarschal Lischka
          XLV. Schützen div., Feldmlt. Smekal
          LIII. inf. div., Genmj. von Pongracz
     Hauer kav. Korps, Gen. d. Kav.
von Hauer
          Polish Legion, Genmj.
von Puchalski
          XI. Honved kav. div., Genmj. Czito    
          I. kav. div., Genmj. de Ruiz
          IX. kav. div., Feldmlt. von le Gay
     Reserve:  II. Polish Legion Brigade, Oberst Köttner

When Archduke Friedrich conferred with Falkenhayn at Teschen in July 1916, the Germans demanded the removal of Archduke Josef Ferdinand from command of the IV. Army.  His forces were caught unawares and paid the penalty.  Therefore, he was replaced by a candidate that had long been on the mind of Conrad: Tersztyanszky, who was disgraced by Hungarian Premier Tisza a year before.  Tersztyanszky took the reins of command intently, but immediately advised further withdrawal, especially as his Fath, Bernhardi, and II. Corps were under attack by the Russian IV. Corps in the north and several others to the south. 

For, the sectors of these Corps formed a wide salient, and the Russians in the south were actually pushing north and behind the IV. Army rather than due west as the offensive had generally raged.  Tersztyanszky offered a fighting retreat to straighten his lines and take up a position on the right bank of the River Stochod.  Thus, the long-fought-for town of Czartorysk was surrendered and the endless swampy forests between that place and the Stochod were abandoned.

GWS, 10/01
Orders of Battle:  Galician Front, August 1916
Immediately following the Brussilov Offensive

Linsingen Army Group
IV. Armee, Generaloberst Tersztyánszky von Nádás
     Szurmay Korps, Feldmlt.
Szurmay
          X. kav. div., Genmj. von Bauer
          XI. inf. div., Genmj. von Obauer
          LXX. Honved inf. div., Genmj.
Goldbach
     X. Korps, Feldmlt. von Csanady
          II. inf. div., Genmj. von Jemrich
          XIII. Schützen div., Feldmlt.
von Kaiser
          XXXVII. Honved inf. div., Genmj. Haber
     Lüttwitz Group, Genlt. von Lüttwitz
          XX. kav. div., Genlt. von Schöler
          XIX. inf. div., Genlt. von Schmettau
          CXXI. inf. div., Genmj. von Ditfurth
          XXIX. inf. div., Feldmlt. Schön
     Bernhardi Army Group, Gen. d. Kav.
von Bernhardi
          Comb. German div., Genmj. Rusche
          CVII. Deutsch div., Genmj. Hahndorff
     II. K.u.K. Korps, Feldmlt.
Kaiser
          XLI. Honved inf. div., Genmj.
Schamschula
          IV. inf. div., Genmj. Pfeffer
     Fath Korps, Gen. d. Inf. Fath
       Kneußl Group, Genlt.
von Kneußl
          Polish Legion, Genmj.
von Puchalski
          XXVI. Schützen div., Genmj. von Wieden
          XLV. Schützen div., Genmj. von Stöhr
          XI. Bay. div., Genlt.
von Kneußl
          LIII. inf. div., Genmj. von Pongracz
          Deutsch comb. div., Genlt. Clausius
     Hauer kav. Korps, Gen. d. Kav.
von Hauer
          I. kav. div., Genmj. de Ruiz
          IX. kav. div., Gennmj. von le Gay
          Bay. kav. div., Genlt. von Hellingrath

Tersztyanszky had thought abandoning Czartorysk and making for the swamps would bring him a respite, but General Everth, commander of the Russian Western Front, had a secret up his sleeve.  He intended to outdo Brussilov by unleashing the Russian Guards Army against Tersztyanszky, force the Stochod, and capture Kowel--perhaps even drive to Vladimir Volynski on the same railway line.  The Guards as a force had not been in action for eleven months.  During this respite, they received only the most thorough training and rations.  Everth therefore prepared to glorify them in this return to action.  The Russian XXX. Corps, which had compelled the IV. Army to abandon Czartorysk, was in the van. 

On 28 July, the general assault began all along the Stochod.  The positions of the IV. Army on this line were as follows:  Berhardi,
Kaiser, Fath, and Hauer.  To these four Corps only three main causeways through the marshes were open to the Russians.  As the Guards approached the river, they were open to merciless gunfire from the air by German planes, while snipers took the rest.  After a week, some 55,000 men were lost, and Everth halted the effort to seize Kowel.  Humiliated, Everth gave Brussilov his reserves so his more illustrious comrade could continue the struggle in the direction of Vladimir Volynski, on firmer ground.

GWS, 10/01
Orders of Battle:  Eastern Front, November 1916
Immediately following the defeat of Roumania

Linsingen Army Group
IV. K.u.K. Armee, Generaloberst Tersztyánszky von Nádás
     Marwitz Group, Gen. d. Kav.
von der Marwitz
     Beckmann Group, Genlt. Beckmann
          CVIII. Deutsch inf. div., Genlt. Beckmann
          II. Deutsch Guards div., Oberst von Arnim
          CXV. inf. div., Genmj. von Kleist
     Szurmay K.u.K. Korps, Feldmlt.
Szurmay
          XI. inf. div., Genmj. von Metz
          X. Deutsch Landsturm div., Genlt. von Stocken
     X. K.u.K. Korps, Gen. d. Inf. von Csanady
          XIII. Schützen div., Feldmlt. Kalser von Maasfeld
          II. inf. div., Genmj. von Jemrich
     Reinforced X. Deutsch Korps, Genlt. Schmidt von Kobelsdorf
          XIX. Deutsch inf. div., Genmj. von Hülsen
          XX. Deutsch inf. div., Genmj. Wellmann
          CXXI. Deutsch inf. div., Genmj. von Ditfurth
          XXIX. K.u.K. inf. div., Feldmlt. Schön
     Support: CCXV. Deutsch inf. div., Genmj. Gronau
          CCXVIII. Deutsch inf. div., Genmj. Gentner
Orders of Battle:  Eastern Front, July 1917
Immediately preceding Brussilov's second offensive (Kerensky Offensive)

Prinz Leopold von Bayern Front,
Generalfeldmarschal Prinz Leopold
Böhm-Ermolli Group, Gen. d. Inf.
von Böhm-Ermolli
III. K.u.K. Armee, Generaloberst Tersztyánszky von Nádás
          V. inf. div., Genmj. von Felix
     XIII. Korps, Feldmlt.
von Schenk
          XLII. honved inf. div., Genmj. Mihaljevic
          XXXVI. inf. div., Genmj. Nöhring
     XXVI. Korps, Feldmarschal
von Hadfy
          XV. inf. div., Genmj. von Aust
          II. kav. div., Genmj. von Abele
    Reserve: XVI. inf. div., Genmj. von Kaltenborn
          LXXXIII. Deutsch inf. div., Genmj. von Stumpf
     Assigned in July:  VIII. Bayerisch res. div., Genmj. Jehlin
          XVI. Deutsch res. inf. div., Genlt. Sieger
          XX. Deutsch inf. div., Genlt. Wellmann
          Bayerisch kav. div., Genmj. von Egloffstein
Kerensky, July 1917:  Surely the Russians Cannot Make Another Push?

Eager to prove to the Entente that Russia was still worthy of receiving spoils after their victory, Alexander Kerensky ordered his commander-in-Chief General Kornilov to prepare for another summer offensive. Kornilov gave the leadership to General Brussilov, who was so successful in breaking the Austrian lines the summer before. 

Brussilov had the difficult task of searching for divisions that were still fight-worthy.  He found the VII. Army under General Belkovich and the XI. Army under General Erdelli to be most competant.  Added to this was General Kornilov's VIII. Army along the Dniester. 

Tersztyánszky's III. Army was situated across the trenches from Kornilov.  The Russians attacked on 1 July 1917, with the aim of breaking through to Lemberg.  Tersztyánszky's army suffered a severe initial assault by the Russians, and within the first day, lost over 30 miles to the enemy, as well as thousands of prisoners.  The cities of Kalusz and Halicz were lost to the Russians within a week, but the weakness of the III. Army was being countered by the strength of General von Bothmer's German Süd Armee on its left flank. 

Attacks against the Süd Armee also resulted in initial gains by the Russians, but whereas the Austrians had fled in disarray, the Germans were retiring in order.  The Russians soon lost their steam and slowed their advance significantly.  Meanwhile, Supreme Commander of the East General Hoffmann prepared a supply line and allocated reserves for a counteroffensive. 

On July 19, the opening bombardment occurred in northern Galicia which broke the new Russian front.  This sent a shockwave across the whole battlefront, and the tide turned against the Russians.   The most famous photograph of the 1917 campaign shows Russian soldiers running for their lives after throwing down their weapons (see below). 

The  III. Army managed to throw back the Russians who had brought near destruction to them three weeks earlier, but Tersztyánszky was no longer in command.  He may have been one the last K.u.K. commanders to be ousted at the Germans' insistance.  General Kritek was appointed to replace him, and the III. Army proceeded to follow the demoralised Russians beyond the frontlines of 1 July 1917 and pursued them eastward, capturing Kolomea, Sniatyn, and finally Czernowitz at the beginning of August.  Kornilov prepared a battleline on the Zbrucz River, which was the Austrian-Russian border prior to WWI.  This was the furthest advance by the Austrians on the Podolian Front yet.

GWS, 12/00
Russian soldiers throw down their weapons and run for their lives in response to a counterattack by the German Südarmee.  This is the only photo of the Kerensky Offensive period that is easily found.  It is taken from the north (looking south), somewhere close to Halicz in Eastern Galicia.
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