Dragonflies & Damselflies - Page 1
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Chin’s Nature Corner
CHIN'S NATURE CORNER ~ PHOTO GALLERY ~ DRAGONFLIES & DAMSELFLIES PAGE 1

Dragonflies and Damselflies

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Neurothemis fluctuans. Copyright © Chin Fah Shin. DRAGONFLIES are generally difficult to photograph because these insects have very good eyesight that can detect even the slightest movement. It's just not easy to sneak up on them. Like dragonflies, damselflies belong to the insect order Odonata.

These are some of the species that I have managed to capture on film. Unfortunately, I'm not able to provide the names for all the species shown here. Where names are given, these species have been identified for me – from my colour slides – by a dragonfly enthusiast. This is not the best way to identify species. If you find any mistakes here, please let me know so that I can put things right. You can either email me or post a message in my guestbook.

Click on the picture or name of a dragonfly/damselfly. A larger picture will open in a new window. Close that window after viewing to return to the main page.

Dragonflies

Dragonfly 1

Neurothemis fluctuans is a common yet beautiful species of dragonfly. It may be found at the forest fringe, in secondary vegetation and other localities near water. I photographed this specimen in the Kuala Lumpur Lake Garden one late afternoon many years ago.

Neurothemis fluctuans

Neurothemis fluctuans... this is a more recent photograph taken in a sort of a green haven inside a university campus. Though it’s a common species, I have not seen it in villages and rural areas. It seems to prefer relatively undisturbed localities at the forest fringe or secondary vegetation.

Neurothemis fluctuans?

This dragonfly can usually be seen in localities where Neurothemis fluctuans is found. Could it be the female of this species? Although it has a different colour, this is a possibility as most dragonflies exhibit sexual dimorphism.

Neurothemis fluctuans?

There was a time when I was younger and my eyesight was better. There was a time when I was adventurous enough to try shooting against the light. This backlighted shot of a dragonfly was taken one afternoon in April 1984. I believe I had used a small flash for fill-in.

Dragonfly (close-up)

It’s usually impossible to get this close to a dragonfly (in the tropics where they are active). Persistence eventually paid off, and I got this close-up shot after repeated attempts. The dragonfly flew away each time I approached it, but eventually accepted my presence.

Dragonfly 6

Trithemis aurora is a beautiful dragonfly of medium size with a pink body and deep red veins. This specimen was photographed perched over a man-made pond at the fringe of a forest not far from Kuala Lumpur city.

Ictinogomphus decoratus

Ictinogomphus decoratus is a large dragonfly with a wingspan that can reach up to 13-15cm. It has a swift flight. When large specimens fly over a pond hawking for prey, you could almost hear their wings rustling in flight. This species is found at the forest edge.

Neurothemis tulia

Neurothemis tulia spots an unusual colour combination for a dragonfly... a black body and black wings edged with white. The wing tips are transparent. I don’t know if this species is rare (or uncommon) but so far I have seen it only once. I’ll keep looking.





 This page revised on 22 May 2005. Copyright © Chin Fah Shin.
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