THE INTERNET AS AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL IN ESOL WRITING INSTRUCTION

A thesis submitted to the faculty of
San Francisco State University
in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the
degree

Master of Arts
in
English: English as a Foreign/Second Language

by
Karla Frizler
San Francisco, California
December, 1995

Copyright © 12/06/95 by Karla Frizler. Reprinting of this thesis in its complete, unmodified form for strictly non-profit purposes is both authorized and encouraged provided that this copyright is included.


To cite information from this paper, please follow the APA standard for WWW documents as shown below:

Frizler, K. [a.k.a. Frizzy] (1995, December 6). The Internet as an Educational Tool in ESOL Writing Instruction. Master's thesis, San Francisco State University [WWW document]. URL http:http://www.oocities.com/robofriz@sbcglobal.net/frizume/thesis/

ABSTRACT:

Research in the area of computer-mediated communication (CMC) has shown that using technology can provide students with a sense of empowerment and development of communicative abilities. However, little research has been done on the effects of using tech nology in teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESOL) in particular. Through the case study of an online ESOL composition course, this thesis qualitatively explores the potential impacts of one application of CMC--the Internet--on university-l evel ESOL composition students and instructors. Based on the findings, conclusions are drawn and recommendations made for maximizing the educational benefits, and minimizing the limitations, of using the Internet in the ESOL writing classroom to develop the confidence and writing ability of students.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to thank the following people whose support throughout this project has been invaluable to me: Mark Warschauer, Julie Falsetti, Greg Younger, Margaret Grant, Sterling Shanks, Claudia Frank, David Winet, Lisa Heyer, David Hemphill, H. Douglas Brown, Jagdish Jain, Thomas Goldstein, Ricard Santiago Torcal, Thomas Bonk, Gerald Eisman, Eric Klavins, Mary Hudson, Nancy McDermid, Tom Guynes, DJ Beech, Ron Corio, Susan Gaer, Jennifer Allen, Yoshimasa Awaji, Mitch Levine, and everyone in Academic Com puting at San Francisco State University. Special thanks to the subscribers of NETEACH-L, TESL-L and TESLCA-L, my friends and colleagues at schMOOze University, and my real-life friends and family, especially my co-workers at Slim's, my roommate, and my Mom & Dad.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

To download this work in its entirety (213K), choose the THESIS option. Otherwise, choose from the individual chapters below.


Chapter One: Introduction (16K)
Purpose of the study
Justification
Definition of technical terms used in study
Thesis outline


Chapter Two: Literature Review (29K)
Review of published literature and online discussion
Summary of review


Chapter Three: Procedures (32K)
Population and sample
Instrumentation
Validity
Limitations
Data collection and analysis


Chapter Four: Findings (23K)
Students' perceptions
Instructor's perceptions


Chapter Five: Discussion and Teaching Implications (54K)
Discussion
Classroom and teaching implications
Practical considerations before teaching online


Chapter Six: Conclusion and Suggestions for Further Research (12K)


References


Appendices
Appendix 1: Course Outline - FUN 101
Appendix 2: Sample Essay Assignment - FUN 101
Appendix 3: Call For Students - FUN 101
Appendix 4: Interview Questions - FUN 101
Appendix 5: Sample of MOO Screen Without Visual Client


Please send praises, comments or corrections to the researcher via e-mail: kfriz@sbcglobal.net. Thank you for your interest!

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