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Rainforests

a webquest for Stage 3 students

 

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Plants

Animals              

Native Peoples

Forests for life

Conclusion and Evaluation

 

Introduction

Rainforests used to cover 14% of the Earth's land, now they only cover about 5% of the earth's surface, yet they support over 50% of the world's animal, insect and wild plant life.  Most of the rainforests have been destroyed in the last 50 years. Rainforests are disappearing at the rate of about 100 acres every 2 or 3 minutes.  They will be gone by the time you grow up unless we save them with your help!

In this WebQuest you will choose an area of rainforest in the world and prepare a report that will help save this rainforest.  You will need to complete the five tasks.  These are:

Task 1 - show your equatorial rainforest on a world map.

Task 2 - describe how 3 trees or plants adapt to the rainforest ecosystem.

Task 3 - describe how 3 animals or birds or reptiles survive in the rainforest ecosystem.

Task 4 - show how the native peoples live in your chosen rainforest.

Task 5 - show how your rainforest is being destroyed.  Suggest ways in which this rainforest can be protected.

Process:

1.  explore and research information about location, plants and trees, animals, native peoples and destruction of rainforests;

2.  use the recommended websites and other websites, libraries to gather information;

3.  keep a research log book to record all your information;

4.  and most of all enjoy learning about a rainforest ecosystem.

TASK 1:  

Choose an equatorial rainforest in the world and show it on a map of the world.

Information can be found at the following sites:

All about Rainforests                  

Forests for Life

 

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__________________________________________________________________

This WebQuest was designed by Wendy Kemp for the subject 81529 Supervised Project I at the University of Southern Queensland.

Contact me at wkemp@tig.com.au

Last updated: April 18, 2001. Reviewed March 7, 2004.