Matsuo Bashô: Oku no Hosomichi

Nikko

Oku no Hosomichi

 

I lodged in an inn at the foot of Mount Nikko on the night of March the thirtieth. The host of my inn introduced himself as Honest Gozaemon, and told me to sleep in perfect peace on his grass pillow, for his sole ambition was to be worthy of his name. I watched him rather carefully but found him almost stubbornly honest, utterly devoid of worldly cleverness. It was as if the merciful Buddha himself had taken the shape of a man to help me in my wandering pilgrimage. Indeed, such saintly honesty and purity as his must not be scorned, for it verges closely on the perfection preached by Confucius.

On the first day of April l3, I climbed Mt. Nikko to do homage to the holiest of the shrines upon it. This mountain used to be called Niko. When the high priest Kukai built a temple upon it, however, he changed the name to Nikko, which means the bright beams of the sun. Kukai must have had the power to see a thousand years into the future, for the mountain is now the seat of the most sacred of all shrines, and its benevolent power prevails throughout the land, embracing the entire people, like the bright beams of the sun. To say more about the shrine would be to violate its holiness.

It is with awe
That I beheld
Fresh leaves, green leaves,
Bright in the sun.
Mount Kurokami was visible through the mist in the distance. It was brilliantly white with snow in spite of its name, which means black hair.

Rid of my hair,
I came to Mount Kurokami
On the day we put on
Clean summer clothes.
--written by Sora

My companion's real name is Kawai Sogoro, Sora being his pen name. He used to live in my neighborhood and help me with such chores as bringing water and firewood. He wanted to enjoy the views of Matsushima and Kisagata with me, and also to share with me the hardships of the wandering journey. So he took to the road after taking the tonsure on the very morning of our departure, putting on the black robe of an itinerant priest, and even changing his name to Sogo, which means Religiously Enlightened. His poem, therefore, is not intended as a mere description of Mount Kurokami. The last determination to persist in his purpose.

After climbing two hundred yards or so from the shrine, I came to a waterfall, which came pouring out of a hollow in the ridge and tumbled down into a dark green pool below in a huge leap of several hundred feet. The rocks of the waterfall were so carved out that we could see it from behind, though hidden ourselves in a craggy cave. Hence its nickname, See-from-behind.

 

Silent a while in a cave,
I watched a waterfall
For the first of
The summer observances

Monte Kuro Kami, que quiere decir Cabello Negro



Muronoyashima

Oku no Hosomichi, cuaderno de viaje, del gran Poeta de Haiku, Matshuo Bashô.

Nasu

INDEX

  1. Prologue
  2. Departure
  3. Soka
  4. Muronoyashima
  5. Nikko
  6. Nasu
  7. Kurobane
  8. Unganji
  9. Sesshoseki
  10. Shirakawa
  11. Sukagawa
  12. Asaka
  13. Shinobu
  14. Sato Shoji
  15. Iizaka
  16. Kasajima
  17. Takekuma
  18. Sendai
  19. Tsubo no Ishibumi
  20. Shiogama
  21. Matsushima
  22. Ishinomaki
  23. Hiraizumi
  24. Dewagoe
  25. Obanazawa
  26. Ryushakuji
  27. Oishida
  28. Mogamigawa
  29. Hagurosan
  30. Gassan
  31. Sakata
  32. Kisigata
  33. Echigo
  34. Ichiburi
  35. Kanazawa
  36. Komatsu
  37. Natadera
  38. Daishoji
  39. Maruoka
  40. Fukui
  41. Tsuruga
  42. Ironohama
  43. Ogaki
  44. Postscript

Bosque de Bambú, Camino del Haiku.Camino del Haiku

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